About Us

Our Family


Rich was employed for 8 years at Capstone Treatment Center, a Christian residential substance abuse treatment center for adolescents.  While there he served as the Coordinator for both the Education and Canine Therapy Programs.  Rich was largely responsible for  overseeing the selection, care, and training of all the pups at Capstone over the course of a few years.   Rich is now employed in a position as a High School science teacher, which allows him more time with our family as well as the dogs. 


Andrea was a Social Work prior to motherhood, but is now a stay-at-home mom with our four children.  We both grew up with dogs in our families and have always had dogs of our own.  Our children love the dogs and spend time playing with them and our puppies on a daily basis.  Because we homeschool our children, they are involved in the daily care of the dogs and pups, and have learned a lot from the experiences.  And with both of our backgrounds in the mental health profession, it has been important to us to capitalize on the good that our dogs can do for others by involving them in therapy both at Capstone Treatment Center and in the Nursing Home Setting.




 


Why We Are Breeders

We always wanted Labs, and when we got them, we were hooked on this beautiful, intelligent, good-natured breed. We wanted to experience the adventure and meet the challenge of raising a superior Lab, one with good, balanced looks, intelligence, and a good nature.  Our dogs are part of our family, and we breed for a balanced conformation, sweet, laid-back nature, and trainability.  We have helped place puppies we have bred in therapy settings, with special-needs children, as hunting companions, and of course, primarily, as family pets.

We love the process. Expecting each litter of pups is exciting, and watching them be born, sometimes with our assistance, is amazing and rewarding. The pups are adorable as they grow. Getting them off to a great start both socially and physically and sending them home to great new families gives us a sense of pride and pleasure that we have found few other ways.

Over the years we have gotten feedback that assures us we are doing things right.  Families repeatedly tell us that we helped them select the perfect dog, that everyone raves about what a beautiful or intelligent dog they have.  Many of the families that have adopted our puppies in the last few years are back for their second (or third) puppy from us, or come to us by word of mouth from others who have one of our dogs.

 


Our Practices


We take the health of our dogs very seriously, and pay close attention to physical fitness, to avoid the problems caused by canine obesity. Our dogs receive regular immunizations and parasite prevention. In addition they are not housed in kennels when we are at home. They have freedom to run and play in our fenced yard, spend time inside with us (though rarely all at once!), and accompany us on hiking, swimming, fishing, camping, and hunting excursions. Between our training, family activities, and daily life with us and our children, our dogs are very well-rounded and happy.



We take care not to breed our females any more often than is good for them, monitoring the breeding, pregnancy, and whelping closely, keeping detailed records, and working closely with a few different vets, professional trainers, and other breeders. Our pups are whelped in a sterilized area in our home so we can keep a close eye on them. They are watched and handled daily from birth.

As is standard practice, we remove dew claws, worm every two weeks, and give the first immunizations before the pups are ready to go home.  Introducing solid food around 3 1/2 weeks, we slowly increase the servings as the dame spends more and more time away from the puppies, so that they are weaned and on dry food before adoption. When the pups outgrow the whelping box, they move out to our climate controlled indoor/outdoor kennel, just feet from our back door.  They are socialized carefully to set them on the right track for training and good behavior.
 
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